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History and Photos Of U.S. Presidents And The White House

September 18, 2009

WhiteHouseFront

“President George Washington signed an Act of Congress in December of 1790 declaring that the federal government would reside in a district “not exceeding ten miles square…on the river Potomac.” President Washington, together with city planner Pierre L’Enfant, chose the site for the new residence, which is now 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. As preparations began for the new federal city, a competition was held to find a builder of the “President’s House.” Nine proposals were submitted, and Irish-born architect James Hoban won a gold medal for his practical and handsome design.

Construction began when the first cornerstone was laid in October of 1792. Although President Washington oversaw the construction of the house, he never lived in it. It was not until 1800, when the White House was nearly completed, that its first residents, President John Adams and his wife, Abigail, moved in. Since that time, each President has made his own changes and additions. The White House is, after all, the President’s private home. It is also the only private residence of a head of state that is open to the public, free of charge.”
Source: whitehouse.gov

200th Anniversary, White House South Portico

whousesouthporticoclinton2000As part of the festivities surrounding the celebration of the 200th anniversary of the White House, an actor portraying President John Adams re-enacts his arrival at the White House 200 years ago. President Clinton and guests view the event from the South Portico.

Date: November 1, 2000

Creator: Unknown

Credit: Clinton Presidential Library

The White House North Portico
whousenorthporticoclinton1999

The North Portico as it looked in 1999.

Date: 1999

Creator: Bruce White

Credit: Photograph by Bruce White, copyright White House Historical Association

Oil portrait of George Washington(1789-1797)washington-01
This oil portrait of George Washington shows a serious Washington surrounded by symbols of leadership. Washington stands grasping a sword in one hand, a reminder of the Revolutionary War and the President’s role as Commander and Chief. He gestures towards the viewer with the other hand, a reminder that the new nation was governed “by the people”. Notice the volume of the Constitution and Laws of the United States under the table. The United States government purchased this painting in 1800 for $800.00, and it hangs in the East Room of the President’s House. First Lady Dolley Madison saved the portrait from destruction by the British during the War of 1812.

Date: 1797

Creator: Gilbert Stuart

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)
Source: http://www.whitehousehistory.org

Oil portrait of Martha Dandridge Custis Washingtonwashington-02
In 1878, eighty years after Gilbert Stuart painted George Washington’s portrait, Eliphalet Frazer Andrews painted this portrait of Martha Washington. To paint the head, Andrews copied an earlier painting of the first lady by Stuart, but to paint the rest of the figure he used a live model. The dress is a style Mrs. Washington would never have known. Congress purchased the portrait for $3,000 to hang in the East Room with President Washington’s portrait.

Date: 1878

Creator: Eliphalet F. Andrews

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Source: http://www.whitehousehistory.org

George Washington Inspects the unfinished President’s Housewashington-06
George Washington was the only president who did not live in the White House. He chose both the site and the architect of the White House, but the building was not completed by the end of his second term in 1797. This color print shows Washington, left, with the White House architect James Hoban inspecting the progress of the construction.

Date: Unknown

Creator: N.C. Wyeth

Credit: White House Historical Association

Source: http://www.whitehousehistory.org

Oil Portrait of John Adams (1797-1801)adams-01Artist John Trumbull painted this portrait of John Adams while he served as Vice President under George Washington. A strong Federalist and a central figure in the Constitutional Convention, President Adams tried to protect the young nation from the war raging between France and Britain. Adams’ powdered and curled hair was stylish at the time. His big, blue eyes are the focal point of the painting.

Date: c.1792-93

Creator: John Trumbull

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Source: http://www.whitehousehistory.org

Engraving of Abigail Adams
abigailadams-02

Abigail Adams thought it improper to be painted bareheaded, so she is portrayed wearing a delicate lace cap. Mrs. Adams was known for her wit, her intelligence, and her striking beauty. In this engraving, done in 1800, she is fifty-six years old.

Date: copyright 1903

Creator: Bureau of National Literature of Art

Credit: White House Historical Association

The North Front of the President’s House (Adams)
Whousenorthfront-adams

Samuel Blodget Jr. sketched the north side of the White House around 1800 as the building team frantically tried to complete the White House by November 1 of that year, when the government was due to arrive in the new capital.

Date: c.1800

Creator: Samuel Blodget Jr.

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Abigail Adams Supervising the Hanging of the Wash in the East Room

whousewashadams-04 Abigail Adams and her granddaughter Susanna watch as a servant hangs laundry in the unfinished East Room. When the Adames moved into the White House in 1800, many walls were left without plaster, the grand staircase had not been built, and the flooring was unfinished. Because the East Room could not be used for receptions, Mrs. Adams used it to dry laundry.

Date: 1966

Creator: Gordon Phillips

Credit: White House Historical Association

Oil portrait of Thomas Jefferson (1801-1809)jefferson-01
This portrait was painted while Thomas Jefferson was Vice President under John Adams. Jefferson was the first president to be inaugurated in the city of Washington. He was also the first president to entertain on the South Lawn of the White House, holding musical Fourth of July celebrations there, and starting a long-time tradition. Since Jefferson’s wife died before he took office, his daughter, Martha Randolph, served as the hostess of the President’s House. Her child, James Madison Randolph, was the first child to be born in the White House.

Date: 1800

Creator: Rembrandt Peale

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

http://www.whitehousehistory.org

Martha Washington Jefferson RandolphJefferson_martha_Randolph_portrait
Martha Washington Jefferson was born in Monticello, near Charlottesville, Virginia and was named in honor of her mother and Martha Washington, wife of George Washington. Her nickname was Patsy. She is now considered to have been First Lady of the United States from March 4, 1801 to March 3, 1809 because her father was a widower, making her the first First Lady not to be a wife of the president. She was considered by many to be an intellectual. Thomas Jefferson left Monticello to her. Due to financial difficulties she was forced to sell Monticello to James T. Barclay in 1831, who then sold it, in 1834, to a naval officer, Uriah P. Levy, who was an admirer of Jefferson’s.
Source: wikipedia

The Front View of the President’s House (Thomas Jefferson)
whousejefferson-02

This is the earliest known published view of the White House. It illustrates a travel book, published in 1807, and shows the house about the time of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. After the Louisiana Purchase, which doubled the nation’s size, Jefferson sent Meriwether Lewis and William Clark on an expedition to explore the American west from 1803-1806. When the explorers sent plant and animal specimens back to Washington, Jefferson displayed the items in the White House for the public to enjoy.

Date: 1807

Creator: Unknown

Credit: The White House

Oil Portrait of James Madison (1809-1817)madison-01
James Madison, one of the authors of the Federalist Papers, led the United States through its first war as a union, the War of 1812. President and Mrs. Madison refurbished the White House; however, in August of 1814, British troops ransacked the capital, burning the White House and most of the government buildings.

Date: 1816

Creator: John Vanderlyn

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

http://www.whitehousehistory.org

Oil Portrait of Dolley Payne Todd Madisondollymadison-02Dolley Madison defined the role of the White House hostess. Her many parties brought society and politics together at the President’s House. During the War of 1812 she escaped before the British troops arrived, and saved the portrait of George Washington from the fire.

Date: 1804

Creator: Gilbert Stuart

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

http://www.whitehousehistory.org

The South Front of the President’s House (Madison)
whousemadison-03

When the Madisons returned to the White House they found it gutted by fire with only the damaged walls remaining. President Madison insisted that the rebuilding process follow the original plans for the house, approved by George Washington. He hired James Hoban, the original architect of the White House, to rebuild the house. This pen and ink drawing shows the South Front of the restored White House.

Date: 1817

Creator: Benjamin Henry Latrobe

Credit: Library of Congress

Oil Portrait of Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865)lincoln-01
Artist George P. A. Healy began working on this portrait of President Lincoln in 1864. When John Wilkes Booth assassinated Lincoln on April 14, 1865, Healey was forced to finish the work without a model. The portrait now hangs in the State Dining Room. Throughout the Civil War President Lincoln kept the White House open to the public. To encourage the Union, the President would celebrate each victory by illuminating the outside of the White House with thousands of candles nailed to boards.

Date: 1869

Creator: George P. A. Healy

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Source: http://www.whitehousehistory.org

Photograph of Mary Todd Lincoln in a ball gownmarytoddlincoln-02

When Mary Todd Lincoln moved from Kentucky to Illinois, she met Abraham Lincoln, then a young lawyer. They were married three years later and lived happily in Springfield, Illinois with their three boys, Robert, Willie, and Tad. Mrs. Lincoln was intelligent and loved high society. Once in the White House she redecorated it with funds from Congress, but was criticized for spending such large amounts of money during wartime. Her confidence in her husband was unshakable and her devotion unwavering.

Date: 1861

Creator: Mathew Brady

Credit: Library of Congress

http://www.whitehousehistory.org

Rosewood Bed in the Lincoln Bedroomlincoln-bedroom-2005

The Lincoln bed is a rosewood bed nearly 8 feet long and 6 feet wide, with an enormous headboard and large footboard decorated with carved grapes, grapevines, and birds. It was purchased by First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln during her extensive redecorating efforts around 1861. It was originally put in the Prince of Wales Guest Room (today’s Private Dining Room). Young Willie Lincoln died in the White House at age 11 in the bed in the Prince of Wales Guest Room at about 5:00 P.M. on February 20, 1862.

The bed was probably never used by President Lincoln, although several later presidents have used it. The original mattress was made of horsehair. Barbara Bush replaced the mattress, but guests still report that it is lumpy. One occupant, San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown, says it is difficult to clamber into. “You have to step up to get in, and it’s not terribly comfortable.”

Source: whitehousemuseum.org

Union Troops camped out in the East Room (Lincoln)
whouselincoln-09
When the Civil War began, several soldiers slept in the East Room and White House hallways until proper housing could be found in the nation’s capital. In this image Union soldiers relax in the East Room, their baggage in a pile on the right. Five soldiers are playing cards in the center of the illustration.

Date: c.1865

Creator: Unknown

Credit: The White House

Oil Portrait of Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1933-1945)rooseveltfd-01

During President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s twelve year occupation, hardly an inch of the White House was left unchanged. He turned the coat room into a family movie theatre. The kitchens were rebuilt, and a library was created on the ground floor. The West Wing was expanded and the East Wing, complete with bomb shelter, was constructed. In 1933, air conditioning was added to the second floor.

Date: 1947

Creator: Frank O. Salisbury

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Source: whitehousehistory.org


Oil Portrait of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt Roosevelt

whouseeleanorrooseveltfd-02Anna Eleanor Roosevelt greatly expanded the role of first lady through her press conferences, news columns, speeches, travels, and activism. She used the White House to support causes ranging from reforming child labor to providing for the poor in Appalachia to combating the effects of the Depression.

Date: 1949

Creator: Douglas Granville Chandor

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

V-J Day
whouseVJDayrooseveltfd-06Crowds outside the White House celebrate V-J Day, the Japanese surrender and the end of World War II.

Date: August 1945

Creator: Abbie Rowe, National Park Service

Credit: National Archives

President Roosevelt in the Oval Officewhouserooseveltfd-05
President Roosevelt in the Oval Office with his numerous projects and responsibilities. Not only did President Roosevelt expand the West Wing, but he also added an East Wing after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Initially the President wanted the East Wing used as a museum for his White House memorabilia. Instead, it was used for a guest entrance, offices, and an underground bomb shelter.

Date: 1935

Creator: Unknown

Credit: Franklin D. Roosevelt Library

Oil Portrait of John F. Kennedy (1961-1963)whousekennedy-01President John F. Kennedy brought a strong sense of history and culture to the White House. Under his direction, Congress designated all White House interiors worthy of preservation and interpretation and placed the National Park Service in charge of the house’s maintenance. Before he was assassinated on November 22, 1963, President Kennedy expanded the presidential and first lady portrait collection and worked to connect the White House past with its present through its historic décor.

Date: 1970

Creator: Aaron Shikler

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Oil Portrait of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedywhousejackiekennedy-02With a background in art and deep love of history, Jacqueline Kennedy filled the White House with furnishings and art used by previous presidential families. She also acquired furniture that reflected the best craftsmanship. To ensure the White House highlighted American history, she created the White House Historical Association. Mrs. Kennedy wanted a guidebook published to provide the public with a history of the house and its collection. The Association created the book and has updated it ever since.

Date: 1970

Creator: Aaron Shikler

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

The new Kennedy Oval Office in 1963, completed while the first couple was visiting Dallas
and dismantled after the assassination, before Mrs. Kennedy returned
(Kennedy Library) oval-office-kennedy
Source: whitehousemuseum.org

Blue Room, Kennedy Administrationwhouseblueroomkennedy-12

One of the results of Jacqueline Kennedy’s historical research was the placement of French furniture, originally ordered by President Monroe in 1818, in the Blue Room. Cream silk wall coverings, blue silk draperies, gold paneling, and President Monroe’s gold and blue chairs all have a ceremonial affect. Mrs. Kennedy established the position of White House curator to research and protect the house and its objects and ensure that the nation’s home reflected the many presidential families who had lived there.
Date: 1962

Creator: Unknown

Credit: White House Historical Association

Red Room (Kennedy)

whouseredroomkennedys

Date: June 22, 1962

Creator: Unknown

Credit: John F. Kennedy Library

Sitting Room (Kennedy)

whousesittingroomkennedys

Kennedy Bedroom

whkennedy-firstladys-bedroom

The room as Caroline Kennedy’s bedroom in 1962, looking northeast (Credit: Kennedy Library)kennedy-caroline-east-bedroom-1962

Source: whitehousemuseum.org

Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy in motorcade – May 3, 1961

Kennedymotorcademay3,1961

Source: jfklibrary.org

Oval Office Visitwhousemacaronikennedy-13

Source: jfklibrary.org
Caroline and her brother John, Jr. visit their father outside the Oval Office with their pony, Macaroni.

President Kennedy and John, Jr. take a stroll
whkennedy-johnjr-10-10-63Source: jfklibrary.org

Oil Portrait of Lyndon Baines Johnson (1963-1969)johnsonlb-01After Lyndon Baines Johnson took office, he founded the Committee for the Preservation of the White House. This advisory group works with the first lady in presenting the State Rooms in a historically appropriate way. President and Mrs. Johnson also created the Children’s Garden in 1969 on the South Lawn. Traditionally, grandchildren of the president make impressions of their hands and feet in the stone pathways of the garden. One of Johnson’s favorite social activities was to host Texas barbeques on the South Lawn.

Date: 1968

Creator: Elizabeth Shoumatoff

Oil Portrait of Claudia (Lady Bird) Taylor Johnsonjohnsonlb-02
Claudia “Lady Bird” Johnson is best known for her efforts to conserve and beautify the environment. Her love of nature and wildflowers led her to create the First Lady’s Committee for a More Beautiful Capitol. She designed the Johnson White House china with a border of wildflowers. The official flower of each state decorates the center of the dessert plates. Under the Mrs. Johnson’s direction, the East Garden was redone with seasonal flowers and named the Jacqueline Kennedy garden.

Date: 1968

Creator: Elizabeth Shoumatoff

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Oval Office, Johnson Administrationjohnsonlb-18
Each president decorates the Oval Office to his liking, and President Johnson chose red carpet and red and white draperies. The American flag and the presidential flag are displayed behind the president’s desk. During the Johnson administration, the West Wing and White House had a staff of more than 250 people who worked to make it a suitable home and work place for the nation’s leader.

Date: Unknown

Creator: Unknown

Credit: White House Historical Association

Oil Portrait of Richard M. Nixon (1969-1974)nixon-01During the Nixon administration, the State Floor rooms were redesigned in a historic museum-like manner. This was done to allow the American public to view the large quantity of antiques in the White House.

Date: 1984

Creator: J. Anthony Wills

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Oil Portrait of Patricia Ryan Nixonnixon-02
The light greens, blues, and pinks of Henriette Wyeth’s portrait of Patricia Ryan Nixon highlight the first lady’s beauty. While in the White House, Mrs. Nixon added 600 paintings and antiques to the White House collection. On Sundays she held a nondenominational worship service in the East Room as part of an initiative to encourage volunteer service.

Date: 1978

Creator: Henriette Wyeth

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Richard Nixon with comedian and golf-enthusiast Bob Hope in 1973nixon-oval-office-1973-hope

Oil Portrait of Gerald Rudolph Ford (1974-1977)ford-01During America’s Bicentennial in 1976, President and Mrs. Gerald R. Ford hosted State Dinners for leaders of many nations who came to honor the United States. The Fords always followed their formal entertainments with dancing in the Main Entrance Hall. President Ford used the White House grounds, especially the Rose Garden, more than most presidents for events, ceremonies, speeches, and press conferences. The Fords had four children, Michael, Jack, Steven, and Susan. Susan Ford lived at the White House until she attended college.

Date: 1977

Creator: Everett Raymond Kinstler

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Oil Portrait of Elizabeth (Betty) Bloomer Ford

ford-02
Betty Ford supported many causes, including women’s rights. Each first lady selects furniture from the White House collection to display and is allowed to redecorate the second and third floors at will; for instance, Mrs. Ford took Jacqueline Kennedy’s 19th century American Revolution wallpaper out of the second-floor Family Dining Room and painted the walls a bright yellow. Twenty-six pieces of artwork were acquired for the White House through Mrs. Ford’s efforts, and the house was filled with lilies, her favorite flower.

Date: 1977

Creator: Felix De Cossio

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Gerald Ford in the Oval Office, circa 1974 (still using Nixon’s decor) (Ford Library)oval-office-fordSource: whitehousemuseum.org

Reproduction of the Ford Oval Office in the Ford Libraryoval-office-ford-replicaSource: whitehousemuseum.org

Oil Portrait of Jimmy Carter (1977-1981)carter-01President Jimmy Carter initiated the first scientific restoration of the White House exterior. Beginning in 1980, forty layers of old paint, dating back to 1817 and President James Monroe, were removed using chemicals, pressurized water, and hand scraping. After the paint was removed, holes in the stone walls were plugged with carved limestone, and stone decorations were repaired. Once the walls were restored, an even layer of off-white paint was sprayed smoothly and cleanly on the stone. The project was done in stages, and finally completed in 1992.

Date: 1982

Creator: Herbert E. Abrams

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Oil Portrait of Rosalynn Smith Cartercarter-02
Intimately involved in the operations of the White House, Rosalynn Smith Carter managed her projects from an office in the East Wing. She took notes at Cabinet meetings, and represented the president at ceremonial events. Mrs. Carter also focused on the performing arts and invited classical artists to entertain at the White House. The art collection was greatly expanded, and objects such as an 18th century map of Washington, D. C., the earliest engraving of the White House, and a sofa bought by Monroe in 1817 were donated to the White House at her encouragement.

Date: 1984

Creator: George Augusta

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

The Carter Oval Office in 1977 (Carter used Ford’s final decor) (Carter Library)oval-office- carter-1977

Oil Portrait of Ronald Wilson Reagan (1981-1989)reagan-01During the Ronald Reagan administration, more than 150 objects from the White House collection were conserved. The project begun by President Jimmy Carter to strip the outside stone walls of the house of its 40 layers of paint, repair the stones, and repaint the walls continued under President Reagan. Renovation of the heating, cooling, and ventilation systems of the White House, which had not been done since 1952, was also completed.

Date: 1991

Creator: Everett Raymond Kinstler

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Oil Portrait of Nancy Davis Reagan reagan-02 Nancy Davis Reagan focused on refurbishing the private residence on the second and third floors of the White House. Over $1.2 million was raised privately for the project, which included rooms such as the Family Dining Room, second floor Center Hall, East Sitting Hall, West Sitting Hall, Lincoln Sitting Room, Yellow Oval Room, bathrooms, and several guest rooms. Antique furniture from the White House collection was brought out of storage and placed in many of the rooms.

Date: 1987

Creator: Aaron Shikler

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Replica of the Reagan Oval Office in the Reagan Libraryoval-office-reagan-replicaSource: http://www.whitehousemuseum.org

Ronald Reagan wraps up some business on his last day office in 1989 (Reagan Library)

oval-office-reagan-last-day

Reagan Bedroom 1992

whousebedroomkennedys
The President’s Bedroom

Used as a first lady’s suite by Jackie Kennedy and other first ladies (the president often slept next door in what is today the Living Room), this room is traditionally the Master Bedroom of the White House and part of the master suite. A small dressing room and bathroom adjoin to the west.

The room has closets in the rounded north wall on either side of the door to the West Sitting Hall, installed as part of the Truman reconstruction (and duplicated in the Private Dining Room). The closet doors are disguised and papered and paneled like the rest of the wall. Another disguised door on the east wall leads to the Living Room.

This room is the “real” Lincoln bedroom. Abraham Lincoln slept here, though not in the Lincoln bed (that was for guests). In Lincoln’s day, the north end of the room was partitioned off. First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln slept in the bedroom next door (today’s Living Room). The Lincoln bed did serve a president in this room at one time, however. President Wilson and second wife Edith used it in what is today the Living Room.

During the Kennedy time in the White House, Jackie redecorated this room frequently, but always maintained her bed as two twin beds pushed together (JFK liked a very hard mattress for his back).
Source:www.whitehousemuseum.org

Oil Portrait of George Herbert Walker Bush (1989-1993)bush-01In order to better preserve the White House collection, a comprehensive survey of all White House objects, fabrics, and paintings was conducted from 1989-1993. Objects in need of conservation were repaired. President George H. W. Bush had security glass installed in certain windows of the mansion, many of which still had materials used in the 1817 rebuilding. In 1992, the pantry on the first floor was remodeled as a pastry kitchen.

Date: 1994

Creator: Herbert E. Abrams

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Oil Portrait of Barbara Pierce Bushbush-02
In 1992, the White House marked the 200th anniversary of the laying of its cornerstone. Barbara Bush was integral to the bicentennial celebrations, which included the creation of the White House Visitor’s Center, the publication of several books on the White House, and a series of lectures on White House history. The Bushes buried a time capsule at the southwest corner of the White House on October 13, 1992, exactly two hundred years after the White House cornerstone was laid.

Date: 1994

Creator: Herbert E. Abrams

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Oval Office George H. W. Bushoval-office-BushSource: whitehousemuseum.org

George HW Bush and members of his staff at work Oval Office, circa 1992 (Bush Library)oval-office-bush-staff1

Source: whitehousemuseum.org

Oil Portrait of William Jefferson Clinton (1993-2001)clinton-01
President William Jefferson Clinton reinstalled President Eisenhower’s putting green on the White House South Lawn. He also added a quarter-mile jogging track, and often went running with other aides and advisors.

Date: 2004

Creator: Simmie Knox

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

Oil Portrait of Hillary Rodham Clintonclinton-02
First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton oversaw the refurbishment of many State Rooms: the East Room, the Entrance Hall, the Cross Hall, the Blue Room, the Grand Staircase, and the State Dining Room. In 1994, she began to exhibit 20th-century American sculptures in the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden.

Date: 2004

Creator: Simmie Knox

Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection)

The Clinton Oval Office, circa 1996 (Clinton Library)oval-office-clinton
Source:whitehousemuseum.org

Replica of the Clinton Oval Office at the Clinton Library (Larry Miller)oval-office-clinton-replica
Source: whitehousemuseum.org


The Clinton Oval Office, circa 1996
(White House Historical Association)oval-office-clinton1996

President and Mrs. George Walker Bush (2001-2009) bushgw-01
President and Mrs. Bush on the White House South Lawn. President Bush is the second son of a president to later be elected to the executive office. The first was John Quincy Adams, son of President John Adams. Each summer, the Bushes converted part of the South Lawn into a baseball field for the South Lawn Sluggers. After T-ball games, the Sluggers and their families were treated to a White House barbeque.

Date: 2002

Creator: Unknown

Credit: The White House

President Bush and Condoleezza Rice in the Oval Officebushgw-03
National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice meets with President Bush in the Oval Office. President Bush’s office is decorated with American western artwork and the Resolute desk. Tan, brown, and blue are represented in the color scheme.

Date: Unknown

Creator: Unknown

Credit: The White House
Source: whitehousehistory.org

Laura Bush in the Yellow Oval Roombushgw-04
Laura Bush meets with Nane Annan, wife of UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, in the Yellow Oval Room. Dolley Madison first put yellow curtains and furniture in this room in 1814. Jacqueline Kennedy used a yellow color scheme to decorate the room as a formal reception area in 1961.

Date: May 11, 2001

Creator: Paul Morse

Credit: The White House
Source: whitehousehistory.org

President Bush and his National Security Councilbushgw-05
In the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, President Bush met with his National Security Council in the Cabinet Room in the West Wing. This room has been used since 1934 for many important meetings. Vice President Dick Cheney and Joint Chiefs of Staff Hugh Shelton sit to the right of the president, and Secretary of State Colin Powell and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld are to his left.

Date: September 2001

Creator: Unknown

Credit: The White House
Source: whitehousehistory.org

The Treaty Room, George W. Bush Administrationbushgw-08
The Treaty Room was used as a Cabinet room from 1866-1902. Since 1993, it has functioned as the president’s private office on the second floor of the White House. On the wall by the window is a portrait of President Ulysses S. Grant. Grant ordered the table seen here, presently used by President George W. Bush, for his Cabinet in 1869. It has eight locking doors, which each Cabinet member used to store important papers. Behind the table hangs The Signing of the Peace Protocol Between Spain and the United States, August 12, 1898, painted in 1899 by Theobald Chartran.

Date: June 2003

Creator: Peter Vitale

Credit: Photograph by Peter Vitale, copyright White House Historical Association

West Wing Sitting Hallbush_west_sitting_hall_05

President Bush and President-elect Obama in oval officebush-obama-hmed4p.h2
Credit: Eric Draper / The White House

Barack Hussein Obama (2009 -

President Barack Obama speaks with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in the Oval Office 2/2/09.obama4
Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

President Barack Obama’s daughter Sasha hides behind the sofa as she sneaks up on him at the end of the day in the Oval Office, Aug. 5, 2009.obama
(Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama is helped by Vermont Governor Jim Douglas to move a couch in the Oval Office 2/2/09. Governor Douglas met with the President about the economic recovery plan. 2/2/09obama1
Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

President Barack Obama in the Oval Office 1/30/09.obama2
Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

President Barack Obama relaxes on a sofa in the Oval Office with First Lady Michelle Obama and daughters Malia and Sasha, Feb. 2, 2009.obama5
(Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Follow these links and learn more about the White House and U.S. Presidents.
whitehouse.gov
whitehousehistory.org/
The Official White House Photostream
White House Museum
JFK Library

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